Identity Management Blog

*Keep it Simple, Stupid The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) model on Role Based Access Control is a fascinating document (http://csrc.nist.gov/rbac/sandhu-ferraiolo-kuhn-00.pdf). It is loaded with explanations of many important basic RBAC concepts such as Separation of Duties, “permission-role review” that is effectively comparable to user-role review, non-specificity of revocation rules in the standard, etc. Additionally, the standard offers a flat model, a hierarchical model, and a symmetric model with both arbitrary hierarchies and limited hierarchies along with all ...
Read More
Based on my experience, most Identity and Access Management (IAM) consultancies - even the "Big 4" - tend to keep clients in the dark.  Due to the complexity of IAM projects and multiple stakeholders, it's easier to hide the gory details of a project gone wrong until its too late.  Unfortunately, this approach has given the IAM services industry a black eye. 
First off, I would like to would like to express my sympathy to those affected by the terrible earthquake that hit Chile this past weekend.
In part 1 of this 2-part piece I introduced and defined some of the terms relating to identity assurance. In this last piece I intend to illustrate identity assurance's intersection with real-life through some examples.
In this 2-part article, I hope to explain the importance of identity assurance in everyday life. I will first level set on terms and definitions in part 1, and then illustrate with real-life examples in part 2.
First off, I would like to express my sympathy to victims of the terrible earthquake that hit Haiti. I can only wish that the rescue and recovery efforts yield positive results.
On Thursday January 7, 2010 (last week), I had the privilege of representing Kantara Initiative, in my role as Chair of the Identity Assurance[1] Work Group (also proxying for the Healthcare Identity Assurance Work Group) as a panelist in the Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) Workgroup hearings.
Happy New Year 2010 to all. Best wishes in the year that just starts.
In the midst of the holiday season, and with the anticipation and emotion that comes with the end of the year approaching, I have decided to write my first blog - an early new year's resolution perhaps. I must state that I have resisted the urge to blog for the last three years of my career for two reasons: on one end, I feared starting to blog and then dropping off and being inconsistent (just ...